Writing: Not for the faint of heart

Some followers have probably been wondering where in the heck I’ve been lately. Well, life sometimes gets in the way. I’ve had some personal things come up at home this summer, I’ve been busy at my day job, and between hubby and I, we were gone/committed to events every weekend for nearly 3 months. That’s a lot of traveling. Packing and unpacking, laundry, and scheduling of dog sitters. It was fun but exhausting.

writing-a-book-is-a-horrible-exhausting-struggle-like-a-long-bout-of-some-painful-illness-one-would-never-undertake-such-a-thing-if-one-were-not-driven-on-by-some-demon-whom-one-can-neithe

I’ve also been in re-write limbo. That mysterious place where an author takes a finished novel, something that took months if not years to complete, and then must reconstruct it to make it better, stronger. And yes, much of this was done in a car. Thankfully, I’m one of those lucky people who can read in a moving vehicle and not puke.

frustrated-writer

 

Writing a novel is hard enough, but systematically dismantling your baby, scrambling it about, and then assembling the bits and pieces into a decent product is rough. And, not for the faint of heart.

 

THE DARK SIDE, book two in the Randi Lassiter Series, is now finished and waiting for a second pass of editing. I just got the first draft of the cover art and I love it. With any luck at all, I can feed the two or three fans I have a preview of the book next month.

It’s been just over a year since the release of my debut novel and boy howdy, have I learned a lot. It has been an adventure of highs and lows. Some scream worthy, others no more than a moments distraction. From learning how to write a series (didn’t see that coming) to putting together an author platform that I actually (okay, sometimes) use, to educating myself on Indie publishing, it has been a thrilling rollercoaster ride.

Don’t get me wrong, tough as it is, I’m living the dream. I have one book published and a second on the verge of release. What have I got to complain about?

Well, perhaps it’s that I can sit and write for five hours straight and it feels like it has only been five minutes. That I go to bed frustrated, swearing I’ll never write another word again and then race to my laptop the next morning with ideas that just can’t wait to get out.

Or, that I’m obsessed with fixing _________________ (pick one: plot problems, insubordinate timelines, a random comma usage disorder (okay…that’s not a real thing), rogue red-herrings, exposition diarrhea, and dialog that digs in it’s heels, insisting on appearing stilted instead of casual), and poor daily word counts.

And, don’t even get me started on writer’s block!

Writing a book is difficult.

Considering how hard it is to string just two words together some days, its miraculous that I’ve managed to group 90,000 into an order that makes some quirky sense.

Soon I will begin a new novel. This is the first in the Becca Howell series. Becca is a special agent with the DCI (Division of Criminal Investigation) with the Department of Justice (a branch of the FBI) in the Madison office. She’s a grittier character than the protagonist in the first series and I’m looking forward to fleshing her out on the page.

I’ve also updated this blog site to  include some fun/random tidbits. There’s a section called Dead Darlings where I’ll post reader worthy snippets that dropped to the cutting room floor. Also, a section on Research where I hope to share some fascinating stuff I run across when working background on my writing. Research is one of my favorite things and so much of what I learn never makes it in the story, darn it. I hope you find it interesting.

Tell me, what kind of things do you enjoy reading about on other blogs/web pages?

 

How does she do it?

I’m excited to welcome the talented and multi-published author Lauren Smith to my blog today. A prolific writer, Lauren has 15 romance novels/novellas in several sub-genres including Regency era historical, paranormal, gothic, and contemporary adult.

Lauren Smith

I love a good mystery. But,  when I look at Lauren’s bio, book list, accolades and awards, then factor in that she is a lawyer by day, I can’t figure out how she does it all.

Let’s get to know her better and find out.

 

 

What do you think people would be the most surprised to learn about you?

Probably that I’m a virgin, given that I write really steamy romance novels.

That is a shocker! I’ve read some of your novels and I blush just thinking about certain parts of them. (fans face)   It takes talent and practice (writing, I mean) to pen a well done sex scene. Some authors won’t even go there. You’re young and beautiful. So no one is going to believe you’ve never participated on some level of (ahem) extracurricular activity. That said, it’s all the more impressive that you write those intimate scenes so well without the…um…er…full Monty experience.  Kudos, girlfriend!

We know you are a lady lawyer and committed writer. But, what do you enjoy most in your free time?

I love to do photography, walk my dogs, run, draw and watch movies and hang with my friends.

Here is some of Lauren’s art and photography. She’s got an eye for detail.

Lauren’s fur babies.     DSC_0006

Any other passions?

cavalry_2_by_novemberstar88

I adore Audie Murphy and have nearly all his movies and his official biography signed by the author that was a limited print run. *grins. He’s the coolest. Here’s a photo of two riders from the Audie Murphy Days celebration in Texas. 

 

 

Lauren's men

 

Here’s a photo I found of Lauren with what looks to be a group of Audie wannabes.  Looks like great research to me!

 

Other than a computer, what modern convenience could you never live without?

My smart phone. The Audible Audiobook app is essential to my existence!

I’ll have to try that one. Every author has a process—what works for them when they write. What does your writing process look like from first scribbles to finished manuscript?

Lauren page2

 

I write chronologically from start to finish on a book in a Five Star brand five-subject Notebook.  

 

What is your all-time favorite book.

Via Amazon

Via Amazon

Gone with the wind

Via Amazon

 

Man, I can’t believe I have to pick….it’s a tie. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell and The Host by Stephanie Meyer.

 

How about project research, love it or hate it?

Love to buy books for topics, but not so good at following up on reading them! Hahah.

Is there a specific author who inspires you?

Probably Christina Dodd and Marie Force are a tie. They really are amazing writers who have been successful over years of hard work. They’ve taught me to be true to the craft but that it’s okay to want to be successful about it.

You write in various genres, which is your favorite to write?

That’s a tough question. I’d probably say Gothic, even though I only had one book so far written in that genre. It’s just my natural writing voice to make things a little spooky and haunted.

Which is your favorite to read?

Definitely gothic, or classic styled but sexy vampire romances.

Is there a genre you haven’t written but are thinking about trying?

I’d love to write highland romances but the accuracy and accents scare me right now and I would only want to write a good book so I haven’t worked up the courage yet to try.

How long did it take you to write your first book?    Your latest book?

My first book took about 4 months while I was in college. My latest book took about 4 months as well.

And, all in longhand. I’m still impressed!  As a multi-published author, do you have any words of advice for aspiring writers?

Keep writing and view your writing like a business. I see a lot of newer authors who don’t study the market and see what sells. You want to have an original voice but you don’t want to write a book that’s too complicated or fails to register with readers. It’s always important to know what readers like because half the joy of writing is giving readers something they would share.

What projects are you working on?

I’m currently working on a Regency historical and a contemporary new adult!

Tell us a little about a recent release, Climax: Her British Stepbrother.

It’s the 3rd part in my 3 part Serial. All 3  books (Forbidden, Seduction, and Climax) are 99 cents. The story is about Kat, an American college Freshman who moves to England and falls for a handsome, seductive graduate student named Tristan Kingsley. To her shock, she discovers that he’s going to the Earl of Pembroke someday and what’s more, his mother and her father, both who have been divorced from their spouses for years had suddenly met and started dating. Kat and Tristan will soon become step-siblings. I wanted to write a stepbrother story but have them meet and fall in love before their parents start dating.

Forbidden: Book 1 in Her British Stepbrother Series

He’s her first. He’s her everything. He’s her . . . stepbrother.

Kat has always been a good girl. She studies hard and never stays out too late. But when sitting in a pub on her birthday, she realizes she’s a nineteen-year-old virgin who’s never really lived. And she wants tonight to be the night that changes.

Then she sees him walk in. He’s tall, dark, handsome, and straight out of her deepest fantasies. His voice makes her knees feel weak, and when he smiles, she imagines him doing wicked things to her in bed. From the look in his eyes, she knows he’s imagining it too. So when he asks if he can walk her home, she hears herself whisper yes . . .

Catch up with Lauren:

Amazon Bestselling Author Lauren Smith is an attorney by day, author by night, who pens adventurous and edgy romance stories by the light of her smart phone flashlight app. She’s a native Oklahoman who lives with her three pets, a feisty chinchilla, sophisticated cat and dapper little schnauzer. She’s won multiple awards in several romance subgenres including: Amazon.com Breakthrough Novel Award Quarter-Finalist and Semi-Finalist Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Award.

To get alerts for her latest releases sign up for Lauren’s newsletter visit her at www.laurensmithbooks.com                 or          The League of Rogues

Author interview: Rosanna Leo

Today I’m hosting multi-published romance author, Rosanna Leo. Winner of the 12957 (167x250)Reader’s Choice 2015 in Paranormal Romance at The Romance Reviews, Rosanna draws on her love of mythology for her books on Greek gods, selkies and shape shifters.  A library employee by day, she is honored to be a member of the league of naughty librarians who also happen to write romance. Star-crossed loves are her specialty.

 

Rosanna, what do you think people would be the most surprised to learn about you?

I’ve been watching the British soap opera Coronation Street for over 20 twenty years now. It’s a lot different from American soaps, less flashy with regular people, and over-the-top in the drama department. Sometimes I cringe when I watch but it’s become like a sickness, an addiction. If I don’t watch, I wonder. However, it’s the sort of show where you can miss a week and easily return to it. Much of the time, it serves as background noise while I fold my laundry.  

unrealitytv.co.uk

unrealitytv.co.uk

Although I’ve never heard of this one, I love the kind of show you can have on while you run around the house and get stuff done. It feels less like work that way. 

What do you enjoy most in your free time?

Reading is a big thing for me, as I suspect it is for so many writers. I never grow tired of finding new authors. However, I also love hiking and being in nature. I’m a gardener at heart, although I’m sad to report my thumb isn’t very green and I don’t often have success. Traveling is another biggie. My husband and I both love discovering new places to visit. Our favorite places are England and Mexico but we hope to roam elsewhere as well.

These are photos from Rosanna’s London trip!

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London skyline

Hampton Court in London

Hampton Court in London

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other than a computer, what modern convenience could you never live without?

I probably wouldn’t do too well in this life without a microwave. Unfortunately, I’m not the best of cooks so I often have to resort to nuking food. It’s not unusual for me to BBQ something, turn off the BBQ, and realize the meat is under cooked. Hello, microwave.

Every author has a process—what works for them when they write. What does your writing process look like from first scribbles to finished manuscript?

The first thing I do is tackle character sketches for the main characters. What are their wounds, their goals? What do they look like and what are their histories? Then I set to work on an outline, but I leave it somewhat fluid so I can make changes. At that point, I really need to start writing. I don’t like to spend days outlining because I tend to make alterations as I go.

What is your all time favorite book and why?

I think it will always be the Narnia Chronicles by C.S. Lewis. Those books were my childhood favorites and I still love the sense of magic and mystery and even the underlying faith. Plus Aslan struck me as hot. I think he might be behind my decision to write about shape shifter heroes.      

neversaybook.blogspot.com

neversaybook.blogspot.com

Project research, love it or hate it?

Love it! I studied history and literature at university, as well as classical singing, so research was always a big part of my education. I can sit in a library for hours and never get bored. I do believe a writer can possibly reach a moment when it’s time to “let go” of the research and start writing, however. Make sure you know what you’re talking about and then write what you need to write.

Is there a specific author who inspires you?

Boy, anyone who sticks around in this business inspires me. It isn’t always easy. I really look up to authors like Meg Cabot and Susan Mallery. They’ve endured and always manage to write something new.

How long did it take you to write your first book?    Your latest book?

The first book I ever wrote was the one that eventually became Night Lover, one of my paranormal romances. That one originated years ago but the story was very different back then. It went through many changes and it took me years (on and off) to complete. My latest book, a currently unpublished contemporary romance called A Good Man, took a few months from start to finish. I know what I want to convey now so I don’t allow myself to agonize for years. At some point, you have to write “The End.”

Is there a genre you haven’t written but are thinking about trying?

To be honest, romance floats my boat. It’s what I’ve always loved and I can’t imagine writing a story that doesn’t have romance at its heart. I may write in various subgenres of romance, but I don’t think you’ll ever see me writing sci-fi or biographies or mysteries. I need that chemistry, that sizzle.

You write romance in various sub-genres, which is your favorite to write? 

I write in both contemporary and paranormal romance and enjoy them both. As I go forward, I will likely continue writing in each of these sub-genres. I love the humanity inherent in contemporary romance. As for PNR, well, I love the fact that characters and conflicts are something other than human.

Which is your favorite to read?

I love most types of romance. For the most part, I gravitate to contemporary or paranormal, but I enjoy a bit of historical and fantasy romance as well. As long as the characters are compelling and sympathetic, I will stick around.

As a multi-published author, do you have any words of advice for aspiring writers?

Work toward your dreams but make sure you do your homework first. A lot of people out there have the perception that they can crack off a book whenever they like and get it published. The reality is different. There is a lot of rejection and a lot of self-doubt to be overcome. If you want to write in a genre, make sure you love it. If it’s not your passion, it’ll show. If you decide writing really is for you, learn the craft and be ready to make it your business as well as your hobby.

What other projects are you working on? 

I just finished a contemporary romance, A Good Man, and it’ll be the start of a whole new series featuring a sexy trio of contractor brothers. Set in Toronto, my home town, it is fun and flirty but will also touch on some deep issues like PTSD. I’m also hard at work on book 3 of my Orkney Selkies and am about to embark on the final book of my Gemini Island Shifters series. 

How did you come up with the title for your latest book?

My last book was Predator’s Rescue, Gemini Island Shifters 7. It wasn’t hard to come up with the title because all the books in this shape shifter romance series begin with “Predator’s” and end with a term that reflects the characters or conflicts. In Predator’s Rescue, both my hero, my heroine, and to some extent a couple of secondary characters needed rescuing. In fact, the actual setting needed a bit of TLC, but I won’t give away too much. 

Tell us a little about Predator’s Rescue.

Predator’s Rescue is the seventh book in my shape shifter series. It’s an important addition to the series because some big conflicts get resolved. The series began as rather light and fun but took a darker turn around book 5. New villains were introduced and a plotline in which many characters were threatened, both physically and emotionally. In this book, our hero Jani is one of the good guys from the Ursa Resort, my shape shifter sanctuary. The heroine, Fleur, is a reformed bad girl. She used to be part of the vicious cult of shape shifters who attacked the Ursa Resort, the Alpha Brethren. However, Jani always knew there was something good in Fleur. In this book, we see her transformation and redemption.

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The official blurb: 

Tiger shifter Jani Fodor should have washed his hands of Fleur Bissette long ago. However, when she disappears from the shape shifter sanctuary on Gemini Island, he can’t forget her, and launches a fraught two-week search to find her. He thinks she’ll be grateful but the petulant she-wolf resents his intrusion in her life.

Jani recently liberated Fleur from a vicious cult of shape shifters, where she was brainwashed by the sadistic August Crane. The wolf shifter terrorized their friends at the Ursa Fishing Lodge and Resort on Gemini Island. Labeled a “bad girl” all her life, Fleur knows she’ll never fit in with the good guys at the Ursa, no matter how much Jani tries to convince her of their regard. Besides, she can’t stay with Jani. Although he’s the closest thing she’s ever had to a friend, their chemistry is explosive in the worst way.

When a new menace arises, in the form of a vicious drug dealer with a grudge, Jani is adamant Fleur accept his help to rehabilitate her addict mother and remove her from the influence of her dealer. Fleur accepts Jani’s assistance but as they work together, friendship erupts into passion. Neither can deny their lust-struck spirit animals and before long, they realize their connection runs deeper than they ever expected.

Despite the threats posed by the drug dealer, the worst danger of all dwells inside Fleur. Haunted by the spirit of August Crane, Fleur is inundated by visions that torment her. She is consumed by guilt and plagued by old hostilities. Can this bad girl make good? And is Jani’s love enough to save her from her demons?

Want more?  Click here to read an excerpt:   Predator’s Rescue

To catch up with this popular author follow her blog:

http://www.rosannaleoauthor.wordpress.com

Cover teaser

 

 

Seeing Red

 

Today I’m hosting Noah JD Chinn of Mossfoot Editing on my blog. He’s graciously agreed to put his red pen aside, or should I say, his track changes and comment bubbles, so that we can learn more about him.

Noah has worked with a variety of writers including New York Times, USA Today and Amazon best selling authors. As both an editor and multi-published author, Noah knows what it’s like to be on both sides of the keyboard and I know first hand what that kind of experience can bring to a project. Noah edited my debut novel, STILL LIFE.

For the benefit of those who haven’t worked with an editor before, let me briefly explain what such a professional does when it comes to bringing your raw project to a shiny, ready for publication, finish. An editor ensures your manuscript follows a logical course to the best ending possible, making it stronger. Then they refine and polish it. He or she will do this while maintaining the writer’s voice and goals. An editor will find balance between the writer’s vision and the publisher’s expectations, all while meeting the needs of the reader. Good editors are sticklers and have an eye for detail. In fact, Noah is probably doing some mental editing on this blog even as he reads it.

Editors are writers, too. In addition to some world-class editing, Noah has also published several genre-blended books and short stories, that include a cartoon series, satire, science fiction & fantasy, paranormal suspense, horror, and his latest, a mystery set in 1985—each one sprinkled with his unique sense of humor.

Let’s get to know a bit more about Noah.                             Noah photo

Describe what would be the perfect manuscript to edit.

One that was good enough to win a Pulitzer yet needed hardly any work from me?

Kidding aside, my favorite authors are those who have a solid grasp of the mechanics of writing, because it means less nitpicking on my end. But more importantly, I enjoy working with those who understand and enjoy the nature of storytelling. Sometimes I’ll end up jamming with authors over email about how arcs might develop, or how to breathe life into a villain so they’re not a cardboard cutout, how to play with certain tropes so they don’t come off as cliche. If it’s a good story and I’m having fun working with it, that’s about as perfect as it can get.

What are the qualities of a good, marketable manuscript?

For a single book it boils down to two things: characters and world. You don’t just want to be invested in the characters, you want to live where they do for a time. Doesn’t matter if it’s a small town or a space station across the galaxy, it needs to feel real enough that you imagine yourself hanging out there with the characters.

For a series you want a sense of something bigger going on as well, to keep you coming back. Not just a matter of having loose threads to tie up, but mysteries you want to uncover, or larger plans you want to see build and coalesce. The trick is introducing or drawing out these things in a way that isn’t ham-fisted.

What are the worst (or common, you choose) mistakes a writer can make with a manuscript?

The most common mistakes are nothing to be ashamed of, they’re common for a reason. Heck, I came up with a list and still add to it from time to time. And sometimes they’re the hardest ones for a writer to notice because they’ve become blind to it.

Overusing visual tricks is one thing, like italics for emphasis, scare quotes, ellipses. Also, short two-word and one-sentence “bam” type paragraphs. These are things we add for visual and tonal style, and are fine as long as they’re not overused.

Over description, whether it be someone’s appearance or using too much stage direction to describe every move someone makes. For example: He strode across the room, turned the door knob, opened the door, left, closed the door behind him, and walked away. (Yes, I have seen sentences almost exactly like that)

Overuse of dialog tags (Bob groaned, grumbled, growled, etc) when “said” will do just fine. If Bob is saying it in a surly fashion, it should come out through the words rather than being told how he said it.

You’ll notice the term “over” pops up again and again, which is perhaps the real lesson to take away from this. Too much of anything will get noticed.

What was the oddest editing experience you’ve ever had?

The true oddities I’ve thankfully been shielded from. Some of the slush submissions our team had to sift through had some doozies, and they would share them from time to time–everything from creepy-as-hell story pitches (creepy as in “this person should be in jail”) to overconfident submissions where the author clearly assumes they’re a best-seller just waiting to be discovered by someone and they are blessing you with the divine opportunity to be that person… those are especially hilarious when they can’t spell. But I’ve never had to deal with those submissions myself, I just get to hear the laughs (and wails) from the editors that do.

Any words of advice to a writer who’s not sure if they should invest in professional editing?

Even my most polished writers still benefit from having a couple of passes from a copy editor (and a line editor to clean up). Writers become blind to their own failings–lord knows I am–and while using friends as beta readers can help, they’re not going to pay the same attention to detail that a proper editor will.

That’s true. Plus, I learned that friends are apt to dance around the hard truth that a writer may need to hear.

Let’s get personal. Tell us three things about you that we don’t already know.

What do you know? Who have you been talking to? What have they told you? Did they send you?

Ha, wouldn’t you like to know.

Let’s choose some really random stuff that you won’t find on my website or blog:

1) I got fired from being a security guard for throwing toonies on the ground trying to pop the center out.

2) In Japan I taught English to the director of the horror movie “The Grudge” at a Starbucks.

3) I still have a drawing my brother drew of me writing a story that he did over 20 years ago. The original is long lost, but I had taken a picture of it and printed off a copy that’s on my office wall.

Three truly fun facts!   But what’s a toonie?

toonie

photo: Royal Canadian Mint

A yes, sorry, forgot you’re not Canadian 😉  Toonie is a 2 dollar coin, which has a silver outer ring and a goldish inner center. When they first came out people complained that the center could pop out if they were dropped hard enough.

 

Other than the computer, what modern convenience could you never live without?

The refrigerator. No fridge means no ice cream. No ice cream means no life. Well, not one worth living anyway.

My hubby would agree.  Are there any unique challenges for an author who also edits professionally?

Finding time for your own writing.

And how do you balance that precious time between your editing job and your personal writer’s journey?

That’s a struggle I’m still dealing with. Working from home requires self-discipline, and I am not exactly a storehouse of that. If something has to be sacrificed on any given day, it’s almost always my own work in favor of editing. I’m hoping to get more focused as time goes on, but it’s not easy. There’s always a new distraction waiting somewhere. Facebook, video games, binge watching TV shows… by the time I figure it out I’ll probably have a VR headset and then I’ll be down the rabbit hole all over again.

Social media is addictive and fun, but it’s a time suck to be sure.

What do you enjoy most when you do manage some free time?

In a word: escape. Exactly what kind of escape can vary.

I live to have real life adventures now and then, bike riding long distance (got eight countries under my belt), hiking up mountains, or just travel in general.

I also like games. My favorite being Elite: Dangerous, because in it I can be a starship captain. There is no plot other than what you impose on it – be a trader, be a pirate, be a bounty hunter, be an explorer. Whatever you want. That freedom lets me create my own adventures in my head.

Writing is another kind of escape, and I sometimes do that in conjunction with my other escapes. I’ve written about my adventures, either as blogs or stories, and I’ve written about games like Elite Dangerous by taking my in-game adventures and fictionalizing it for fun. Yes, this editor writes fanfic.

I also play roleplaying games (of the paper and pencil variety), which kind of combines all of the above, and in a social setting with friends.

Every author has a process–what works for them when they write. What does your writing process look like from first scribbles to finished manuscript?

I usually have a vague idea of the shape of a story, but I’m not the sort to plot everything out ahead of time. I want to be surprised as well as I go along, and I usually am. More than once I’ve had stories end up far different than I originally thought starting out, sometimes because of how the characters develop changes where things go.

So basically, come up with a situation, come up with a character, see how character deals with situation.

What is your formula for finding the perfect plot twist? 

God I hope there isn’t one. Sorry, it’s just that “formula” to me feels like you’re looking for a magic bullet. And once you think you have that, it’s going to be a crutch rather than an aid.

J.J. Abrams talked about his success in screenplays and TV by introducing “the mystery box.”  It’s an effective way of hooking an audience, but getting them to ask questions and a desire to have them answered.

Then remember that this is the same guy who gave us Lost. Lots of great mysteries, but lots of disappontment when it came to giving us answers in the end. If you’re going to give us a mystery box, there better damn well be something good in it.

Anyway, sometimes a twist comes naturally, when you get to a part in a story, look back, and realize there’s something else going on the whole time. I had that experience with Trooper #4, where the role of the protagonist suddenly became clear to me about halfway into my first draft, and changed where the story was going.

If you’re writing with a twist in mind, then you need to make sure you cover your tracks, but still play fair. It’s never fun when a twist comes out and there were no clues beforehand. Clever readers might predict it, sure, but more often than not they predict several possible twists to cover their bases anyway.

If you could thrive solely either as an editor or novelist, which one you choose and why?

Oh, that’s hard. It’s always been my dream to make a living just as an author, but being an editor has one thing that my writing doesn’t – collaboration.  Working with a dozen different authors to make their stories better is very statisfying. Working on my own is just kinda lonely by comparison. But I’m also in control and exploring my stories and worlds, which is hella fun.

I might have to flip a coin on this one.

What is your favorite book of all time? (feel free to say mine, it’s okay :-D)

As much as I’d like to say that, it’s probably The Lord of the Rings. I don’t often re-read novels, but that and Stephen King’s On Writing are the only books I’ve ever re-read more than five times each. I don’t think any story has felt more “real” to me than LOTR.

Tell us a little bit about your recent release.

One of my favorite mysteries is The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett.  The relationship and banter between Nick and Nora Charles was just perfect. Hell, I envied their relationship. So when I decided to write mysteries I wanted to try and capture some of that with James and Lettice Cote. First in Getting Rid of Gary and now in The Plutus Paradox.

As for the setting, in many ways the 1980s was the end of an era for mysteries. Magnum P.I., Murder She Wrote… those kind of mysteries can’t really fly in the internet/cellphone age. And especially not post 9/11. Part of what appealed to the first readers of Sherlock Holmes was that it harkened back to Gaslight London in a time when electricity was taking over. There was a nostalgia for a time that was still in memory, yet gone forever.

I think of the 1980s in a similar fashion, and wanted to use these stories to tap into it.

What other projects are you working on? 

A fanfic story that I hope won’t stay fanfic. The developers of Elite: Dangerous had licenced some official fiction back when it was first released, and I’m hoping they’ll allow more licences to be released in the near future. That would be awesome.

I also have an adventure story called Relics I’m getting ready to submit. It’s basically a modern day Indiana Jones, except with a team of treasure hunters instead of just one. Unlike the James and Lettice mysteries, I’m fully embracing the idea of how technology is changing the adventure story, trying to use everything at our disposal in a logical manner.

Nice, both sound like ambitious projects and I wish you the best of luck!    Thank you, Noah, for spending time here today and being so candid. It’s been a pleasure. 

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 Here’s the scoop on Noah’s latest book:

PlutusParadox-lgThe Plutus Paradox is the second James and Lettice Cote mystery. Set in Vancouver in 1985, it revolves around the sudden kidnapping of Lettice’s father, Harold–a man she thought had been dead for fifteen years. And as If that wasn’t strange enough, the couple are left to care for the missing man’s six year old daughter, Lettice’s sister, also named Lettice.

In a case that spans Vancouver’s preparations for Expo 86 to the reclusive leftover hippie communes of the Sunshine Coast, James and Lettice are on a race against the clock to find out why Harold disappeared fifteen years ago, and who has him now. They soon discover that Harold is a man full of contradictions, but also learn that not everything about his past is what it seems to be.

Amazon               Mundania Press                 Read An Excerpt